Dear Dribbble, I Quit.

About a year and a half ago I was drafted to Dribbble - and in the beginning, it was pretty cool. There were all of about 200 users at the time, everyone was pretty friendly and it was fun to explore the site a couple of times a week and see what people were working on.

Over time, however, Dribbble transformed from what it was in those early days to what it is now: A glorified sandpit for icon designers where all the cool kids sit in one corner stroking each other's genitals while simultaneously throwing sand at everyone else.

Every week is the same:

Part 1: [insert-cool-designer-name] creates some "brand new" social media icons, 700 people tell him how awesome he is, 50 people rebound his shot with their own version of the exact same icons, and later [other-cool-designer] posts a followup icon set which receives comparatively similar treatment.

Part 2: Someone dares to do something different or have an opinion, and the Dribbble Nazis go crazy.  They all gang up on the poor unsuspecting designer and beat him to a pulp for not conforming to their self-imposed standards.

This is not a fucking "community", it's a gang.

I hereby retire from Dribbble roster. I'm bored of the drama from the Dribbble Elite, I'm bored of the copying, I'm bored of the inbreeding, I'm bored of the cliques.

If you need me, you can find me here, or on Twitter. I'll be busy, doing design work because I enjoy it and I get paid for it. Not cause I want lots of people to click the little heart button and leave me a comment.

The real design community, to me, consists of the amazing people who I've met at conferences all over the world, who I've sat in a bar and had a drink with, who I've talked to for hours on Skype about everything but design, who I've come to know and respect for their humility and incredible talent.

Not the bunch of inflated egos who run around on Dribbble patting each other on the back and expressing their design opinions to everyone else as though God himself anointed them to speak on behalf of our industry.

John O'Nolan

Founder at Ghost.org. Writes about open source, startup life, non-profits, and publishing platforms. Travels the world with a bag of kites.